Potato vodkas are pretty rare, but their complexity makes them my favorites. It has the creamy mouthfeel I expect from potato vodkas, but it has a pretty neutral taste. A good vodka that is significantly cheaper than most “premium” vodkas. America’s best potato vodka can only come from one place: Idaho. It is home to the world’s finest, most delicious Russet Burbank potatoes and the birthplace of Blue Ice Vodka. This is where the people behind the brand come and live, this is where our natural ingredients are sourced and our products are made.

  • Friends and family in Ak have never seen Blue Ice (won’t say how I get my stuff, got connected to the low states) and they say this is the best drink they have ever had.
  • It ends with a short, lively clean that makes a really good, invigorating vodka.
  • It’s not worth it in my opinion, but it’s good and it comes in glass which is a bonus.
  • This applies to both the distillation and the water used.
  • Huckleberry is the official fruit of the state of Idaho, so it goes perfectly with Blue Ice.

Less than 3% of the world’s vodka is made from potatoes. It takes about 9 1/2 pounds of potatoes per bottle and about 1/3 less yield per pound and a lot more prep to ferment and distill, making it difficult and expensive. Additionally, celiac sufferers will find this a welcome addition to the types of distilled spirits they can drink. This handmade vodka in America is a blend of cranberry-flavored Blue Ice vodka and their potato vodka made from Idaho Russet Burbank potatoes. It’s a soft, crispy, and aromatic liqueur that is completely natural, gluten-free, and GMO-free. Potato vodkas are consumed less than wheat or corn versions.

From The Farm To The Bottle

This neutral spirit does not contain any additives, citric acid or glycerides that are normally found in most other vodkas. Home of the delicious Russet Burbank potato and the birthplace of Blue Ice Vodka. Idaho is where the people behind our brand come and live, where our natural ingredients are sourced and our products are made. I also have higher strength Russian potatoes and vodkas in my bar but the taste, aroma and price make it my number one. Included in my selection were Chopin, Lukusowa. I was pleasantly surprised that Blue Ice won easily.

Blue Ice Vodka Review

Vodka is the most widely consumed liquor in the world. In 2012, global vodka consumption reached 4.4 billion liters, according to The Economist. The ultimate neutral spirit, vodka, is an indispensable ingredient that can be enjoyed in a variety of mixed drinks and can be drunk neat in exclusive, high-quality versions. Sweet and slightly oily mouthfeel and a bit thick on the tongue, heavy body, with a soft, crunchy bite. Heating the alcohol slightly as it runs down your throat won’t burn. That said, it’s not as thick as some vodkas, but this one comes naturally with no glycerin, citric acid, thickeners, etc. added.

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There is some alcohol burn, but nothing too intense. Take a sip and the vodka is sweet and smooth with a round, creamy mouthfeel. It’s mostly neutral, however, and comes across as clean aside from some warmth and a light nibble. Potato Vodka Blue Ice is a full-bodied, ice-cold clear vodka with a sweet lemon and cherry aroma. The silky and slightly oily palate is clean and earthy with the taste of finely grown potatoes and light hints of citrus and lavender.

Blue Ice Vodka Review

Your contribution helps build the largest community for hobbyists like you. Share your thoughts on Twitter and Facebook and help us spread the exciting world of craft spirits. When one thinks of potato vodka, one often thinks of Russian and Eastern European vodkas, which are oilier than grain-based vodka. My point is that what you put in it matters to taste, depth, and interest. This applies to both the distillation and the water used.

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This one doesn’t really have a strong potato vibe like some of the other potato vodkas. I would compare it to Fris, quite soft, a little bit bitten. The taste isn’t very complex, I’d equate it with the other cheaper vodkas, but it costs a little more. It’s not worth it in my opinion, but it’s good and it comes in glass which is a bonus.

It was noticeably smoother and sharper than the other candidates. I would also compare it positively to the Belvedere and Gray Goose. It was nice to find an American product that could easily beat the foreign competition. The only foreign competitor that would narrowly qualify is the Swedish crystal. Although I haven’t tried Russian Crystal yet, I plan to do so soon.

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It takes nearly 10 pounds of potatoes to make a bottle of blue ice. The vodka is filtered five times through a filter press, charcoal, travertine, crystal or garnet and submicron. This Idaho vodka gets its distinctive smooth taste from local ingredients; Nearly ten pounds of delicious Idaho Russet Burbank potatoes go into each bottle. The vodka is clean and crisp and certified gluten-free. Famous Idaho Russet Burbank Potatoes would be the best premium potato vodka, a big bonus is that the product is gluten-free and GMO-free.

Very smooth and clean without losing the creaminess of potato vodkas. However, in terms of aroma or taste, there really isn’t anything remarkable for me to give 5 starts. Blue Ice is my favorite vodka, which I drink neat and in martinis. There is a slight taste that allows me to choose Blue Ice in comparative tastings. It can be a combination of viscosity, water, potatoes, filtration or the 5 column distillation process that gives you a distinctive mouthfeel, aroma and taste.

We’re Handcrafted And Made In America With A Unique Purpose

Almost any fermentable material can be used to make vodka. The most common bases are grains such as barley, rye and wheat, but potatoes, grapes and corn are also used. Despite the variety of ingredients, the end product is almost entirely pure, clear and neutral. The light flavors and clean flavors of vodka are subtle, but they can be distinctive.

Blue Ice Vodka Review

Cured from the best Idaho potatoes and made with the ingenious science of artisanal distillation, Blue Ice Vodka is the highest quality potato vodka in the world. From the snow-capped peaks of the Grand Teton Mountains, water comes from one of America’s last pristine water sources. Cured from the finest Idaho potatoes and made with the ingenious science of artisanal distillation. Blue Ice American Potato Vodka is made in Idaho using rust-red potatoes.

Blue Ice Vodka Review From Califorya

Blue Ice is a full-bodied, ice-cold clear vodka with a sweet lemon and cherry aroma. It ends with a short, lively clean that makes a really good, invigorating vodka. Another challenge for vodka burners is making a decent-tasting vodka. It’s relatively easy to distill straight grain alcohol, a relatively tasteless product, and cut it with the water you have on hand. The end result is tasteless, tasteless, and uninteresting. To illustrate, try a taste test between a glass of distilled water and a glass of good mineral water.

Blue Ice Vodka Review

You have to distill a lot, leave the desirable flavor elements and not lose them during the filtration. Flavors You can distinguish a Russian distillery from a Latvian one by the mouthfeel and taste of the water used. Less than 3% of the vodka produced worldwide is made from potatoes. At this point things get a bit acidic, but not very burning. While I wouldn’t call Blue Ice a sip of vodka, I’m not looking for a hunter.

For better or worse, Blue Ice hits you with the old school medicinal taste of rubbing alcohol. One shot and you’ll feel like you’re being shot in the arm. Four distillation steps and five filtrations make it clean, but it’s still a powerful spirit. I had trouble drinking this on my own but as a blender it’s fine.

Blue Ice Vodka Review

Served from the freezer, there is just a little nibble on the edges of the tongue and it feels comfortably warm as you go down. The taste has a slight aniseed flavor that is unique to any other vodka you have ever tried. I really like this vodka and it’s a great price at $ 20.00, $ 28.00 for 1.75L. Distilled from any agricultural product, most commonly grain or potatoes. Water is added to bring the alcohol to 37.5% vol. It is usually filtered, often with charcoal, before bottling.

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